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Weldon Writes ... Almost a Blog

Book Review: The Moore House by Tony Tremblay

Take a cup of Matheson's The Legend of Hell House, a cup of Blatty's The Exorcist, and a heaping tablespoon or two of the movie Poltergeist, and you have the basic recipe for Tony Tremblay's The Moore House. Only the basic recipe, however. Tremblay, like any great chef, knows how to add his own tasty ingredients to make the novel his own. And a satisfying, delicious meal it is!

 

The novel starts with a gruesome scene involving a homeless man, and the horror and suspense are unrelenting from there. But I think the book works best because of the interplay and complicated relationships of the main characters (three nuns who are empaths and a priest experienced in exorcisms). All of them are flawed characters—perhaps the priest, Father MacLeod, most of all. Tremblay skillfully manipulates the reader by putting us in the minds of the three empaths (a nice trick there). Father MacLeod, on the other hand, comes off as self-serving and despicable, a character impossible to like. But, in the context of the story, wholly believable.

 

The pacing of the novel is perfect—I found it to be a fast and enjoyable read. The characters, despite the bizarre plot, are realistic. The story is horrifying. If you love horror fiction, this book definitely belongs on your bookshelf. I can't wait to see what Tony writes next—maybe a sequel to this??

 

One last note: If you're a character in a Tremblay novel, you probably don't want to be a police officer. Just sayin' ...

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The Escalating Market Battle Facing Small Indie Publishers

The current Smart Rhino Publications library!

Smart Rhino Publications just completed a Kickstarter campaign for the upcoming anthology, A PLAGUE OF SHADOWS. We reached 178% of our goal, which is absolutely fantastic! We can't thank our supporters enough.

But, you may ask, why a Kickstarter campaign at all? Well, truth be told, small indie publishers are having a rough time of it in today's market. Perhaps the market is overloaded. Perhaps fewer people are buying books. It could be any number of factors. In light of those difficulties, small publishers now have to revise their marketing strategies and find alternative ways to increase funding. Crowdfunding is one of those ways.

Many independent publishers have folded in the past few years for lack of funding and various other reasons. That in itself is sad. But, sadder still,  Read More 

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Jeff Menapace: The Success and Struggle

Jeff Menapace and his copy of ZIPPERED FLESH 3.

Jeff Menapace is a Philly-born horror/suspense author who has won acclaim for his best-selling Bad Games series of novels, among his other work in fiction and nonfiction. His novella Sugar Daddy was the 2011 recipient of the Red Adept Reviews Indie Award for Horror. His novel Numb, while containing some elements of horror, is a dark noir thriller sure to please readers of suspense. And Side Effects, a psychological thriller, introduces us to his series character FBI agent Maggie Allen.

And apparently, he longs to pet a lion!

 

Jeff is an approachable, amiable guy, and was more than willing to spend a few minutes with us to answer a few questions.



Your Bad Games trilogy has been quite successful, now optioned for future feature films. Not bad! Did you intend to write a trilogy from the start, or was it happenstance?

No way did I intend to write a trilogy from the start! I wrote book one and was able to land an agent with it (this was nearly 10 years ago) and he immediately asked me for a sequel, stating that pitching two books instead of the one would help land a publisher. So, I got hard at work on the sequel, completed it, gave it to my agent, and  Read More 

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Jack Ketchum: Master of Mayhem

It’s hard to believe that Jack Ketchum’s debut novel, Off Season, was released back in 1980. The controversial book, involving grotesque acts of cannibalism, immediately garnered fans in the horror world, even though the original publisher abandoned support for the novel. Today, the book is a classic in horror literature, and Jack his written more than 20 novels and novellas since then. He has won several Bram Stoker Awards, and five of his books have been produced as films—The Girl Next Door, Red, The Lost, Offspring, and The Woman.

Not surprising, Jack always has projects in the works, and has recently collaborated a good deal with director, writer, and actor Lucky McKee. I was thrilled that he was willing to take some time to answer a few questions.


You’ve had a fruitful relationship with Lucky McKee, including the recent collaboration, The Secret Life of Souls. How did you two hook up, how did it come about?

Lucky knew about my stuff and wanted to option Red for himself to direct and The Lost for his buddy Chris Sivertson and by way of introduction he sent me a copy of May. I’d just returned from some Con or other with a stack of what turned out to be amateurish, bad DVDs from various people, and waiting on my desk was a DVD by this guy named Lucky, so I figure, after watching half a dozen of these things, this has gotta be more of the same. I mean, the guy’s name is Lucky.’ So after a week or so I get to feeling guilty and watch the rest of this drek, and the last one I watch is May. Good grief! this is the real deal! Brilliant movie! So I get hold of my agent and tell her let's get back to him right away, he wants to option Red and The Lost if the price is anywhere near right, he’s got ’em. Turned out Luck and I are simpatico as all hell, very much on the same page as to what we want from our stories, our people, our themes. So we decided to work together on some original pieces. Which turned out to be The Woman, I’m Not Sam, and The Secret Life of Souls, with a couple of short pieces in the bargain.

You’ve used a number of pseudonyms, particularly when you were writing for men’s magazines early on. For new writers, what are the pros and cons of using pseudonyms, from your experience?

I don’t see any cons, really. After a short while  Read More 

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