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Weldon Writes ... Almost a Blog

Book Review: The Moore House by Tony Tremblay

Take a cup of Matheson's The Legend of Hell House, a cup of Blatty's The Exorcist, and a heaping tablespoon or two of the movie Poltergeist, and you have the basic recipe for Tony Tremblay's The Moore House. Only the basic recipe, however. Tremblay, like any great chef, knows how to add his own tasty ingredients to make the novel his own. And a satisfying, delicious meal it is!

 

The novel starts with a gruesome scene involving a homeless man, and the horror and suspense are unrelenting from there. But I think the book works best because of the interplay and complicated relationships of the main characters (three nuns who are empaths and a priest experienced in exorcisms). All of them are flawed characters—perhaps the priest, Father MacLeod, most of all. Tremblay skillfully manipulates the reader by putting us in the minds of the three empaths (a nice trick there). Father MacLeod, on the other hand, comes off as self-serving and despicable, a character impossible to like. But, in the context of the story, wholly believable.

 

The pacing of the novel is perfect—I found it to be a fast and enjoyable read. The characters, despite the bizarre plot, are realistic. The story is horrifying. If you love horror fiction, this book definitely belongs on your bookshelf. I can't wait to see what Tony writes next—maybe a sequel to this??

 

One last note: If you're a character in a Tremblay novel, you probably don't want to be a police officer. Just sayin' ...

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